Event: PLAYING AGE – A Symposium, The Centre for Drama, Theatre, and Performance Studies

February 27-28th, 2015

The Centre for Drama, Theatre, and Performance Studies is proud to announce Playing Age, an inter-disciplinary symposium that will be held at the University of Toronto from February 27-28, 2015 at the Helen Gardiner Phelan Playhouse. Renowned scholars Elinor Fuchs (Yale University, School of Drama) and Margaret Morganroth Gullette (Brandeis University, Women’s Studies Research Center) will present keynote addresses.


A conference programme is available at http://playingage.wordpress.com

This symposium is co-sponsored with the generous support of:

  • The Ageing, Communication, and Technologies (ACT) initiative
  • The Centre for Comparative Literature
  • The Centre for Drama, Theatre, and Performance Studies
  • The Jackman Humanities Institute
  • Department of English at St. George
  • Department of English and Drama, UTM
  • Department of English, UTSC
  • Rick Halpern, Dean and Vice Principal Academic, UTSC
  • Malcolm Campbell, Office of the UTSC VPR

Admission will be free and open to the public.

Please direct inquiries to the co-organizers Profs. Marlene Goldman (mgoldman@chass.utoronto.ca) and Lawrence Switzky (lawrence.switzky@utoronto.ca).

The symposium Playing Age offers a humanistic exploration of aging, old age, and inter-generational relations. Seminal theorists of play, from Johan Huizinga to Roger Caillois, claimed that rule-bounded games and mimetic enactments create a magic circle in which conflicts within the self and the community can be negotiated at a safe remove.

More recently, performance and game theorists have insisted that even playing within the bounded precincts of a stadium, a theatre, or a video game influences everyday conduct, particularly when we play with volatile topics like inter-cultural representations, social class, race and gender. This symposium asks how aging and old age can be investigated through playing, specifically the playfulness of artistic representations, and whether
resistant to, imaginative inhabitations.